Thursday, April 19, 2012

The Woman in Black is a 2012 thriller-horror film directed by James Watkins and written by Jane Goldman, and is based on Susan Hill's novel of the same name. It is produced by Hammer Film Productions. The film stars Daniel Radcliffe, Ciarán Hinds, Janet McTeer, Sophie Stuckey, and Liz White. It was released in the United States and Canada on 3 February 2012 to generally positive reviews, and was released in the United Kingdom on 10 February 2012.[5][6]
My First Movie Review….
I intended in sharing the entire Wiki entry with you guys pertaining to the book but they give away everything.  So Ill stick to two insights.  One the movie is loosely based on the book.  Two, music and sound is used to augment and fill in the parts the author needs to work so hard at describing and building up to.  I think I am a bit mentally slow to only notice that now, but hey, give me a break, this is the first time I watched a movie back to back to reading the book and the very first time I am doing it for  reviews.  But it is such a revelation I had to share.  And it is unfair, having loud bangs is no substitute for work.  But, do I recommend you watch the movie, Oh yes.  It is the best ghost story I have watched in a very long time and I was impressed.  Daniel Radcliffe was not as impressive, maybe because I kept waiting for him to get his wand. . . . I give this a five popcorn movie rating.  So worth the watch.
The book, my review
I loved the story and revelled in the use of language to draw me in and down to the very pit of fear.  The language usage in this book is superb.  I would recommend you read this even if ghost stories is not your thing.  This is seriously a must read book.  It was a gift from Denise Jones for my birthday and one of the best presents I  have ever received.  EVER……. Thank you Denise.
Goodreads Blurb.
What real reader does not yearn, somewhere in the recesses of his or her heart, for a really literate, first-class thriller: one that chills the body with foreboding of dark deeds to come, but warms the soul with perceptions and language at once astute and vivid? In other words, a ghost story by Jane Austen.
Austen we cannot, alas, give you, but Susan Hill's remarkable Woman In Black comes as close as the late twentieth century is likely to provide. Set on the obligatory English moor, on an isolated causeway, the story's hero is Arthur Kipps, an up-and-coming young solicitor who has come north to attend the funeral and settle the estate of Mrs. Alice Drablow of Eel Marsh House. The routine formalities he anticipates give way to a tumble of events and secrets more sinister and terrifying than any nightmare: the rocking chair in the nursery of the deserted Eel Marsh House, the eerie sound of pony and trap, a child's scream in the fog, and, most dreadfully, and for Kipps most tragically, the woman in black.
The Woman In Black is both a brilliant exercise in atmosphere and controlled horror and a delicious spine-tingler-proof positive that that neglected genre, the ghost story, isn't dead after all
About this author

Susan Hill was born in Scarborough, North Yorkshire in 1942. Her hometown was later referred to in her novel A Change for the Better (1969) and some short stories especially "Cockles and Mussels".

She attended Scarborough Convent School, where she became interested in theatre and literature. Her family left Scarborough in 1958 and moved to Coventry where her father worked in car and aircraft factories. Hill states that she attended a girls’ grammar school, Barr's Hill. Her fellow pupils included Jennifer Page, the first Chief Executive of the Millennium Dome. At Barrs Hill she took A levels in English, French, History and Latin, proceeding to an English degree at King's College London. By this time she had already written her first novel,
Susan Hill was born in Scarborough, North Yorkshire in 1942. Her hometown was later referred to in her novel A Change for the Better (1969) and some short stories especially "Cockles and Mussels".

She attended Scarborough Convent School, where she became interested in theatre and literature. Her family left Scarborough in 1958 and moved to Coventry where her father worked in car and aircraft factories. Hill states that she attended a girls’ grammar school, Barr's Hill. Her fellow pupils included Jennifer Page, the first Chief Executive of the Millennium Dome. At Barrs Hill she took A levels in English, French, History and Latin, proceeding to an English degree at King's College London. By this time she had already written her first novel, The Enclosure which was published by Hutchinson in her first year at university. The novel was criticised by The Daily Mail for its sexual content, with the suggestion that writing in this style was unsuitable for a "schoolgirl".

Her next novel Gentleman and Ladies was published in 1968. This was followed in quick succession by A Change for the Better, I'm the King of the Castle, The Albatross and other stories, Strange Meeting, The Bird of Night, A Bit of Singing and Dancing and In the Springtime of Year, all written and published between 1968 and 1974.

In 1975 she married Shakespeare scholar Stanley Wells and they moved to Stratford upon Avon. Their first daughter, Jessica, was born in 1977 and their second daughter, Clemency, was born in 1985. Hill has recently founded her own publishing company, Long Barn Books, which has published one work of fiction per year


What real reader does not yearn, somewhere in the recesses of his or her heart, for a really literate, first-class thriller: one that chills the body with foreboding of dark deeds to come, but warms the soul with perceptions and language at once astute and vivid? In other words, a ghost story by Jane Austen.
Austen we cannot, alas, give you, but Susan Hill's remarkable Woman In Black comes as close as the late twentieth century is likely to provide. Set on the obligatory English moor, on an isolated causeway, the story's hero is Arthur Kipps, an up-and-coming young solicitor who has come north to attend the funeral and settle the estate of Mrs. Alice Drablow of Eel Marsh House. The routine formalities he anticipates give way to a tumble of events and secrets more sinister and terrifying than any nightmare: the rocking chair in the nursery of the deserted Eel Marsh House, the eerie sound of pony and trap, a child's scream in the fog, and, most dreadfully, and for Kipps most tragically, the woman in black.
The Woman In Black is both a brilliant exercise in atmosphere and controlled horror and a delicious spine-tingler-proof positive that that neglected genre, the ghost story, isn't dead after all
 I give this book a 8 ******** star review and say wow.......

2 comments:

  1. I was the same when I was watching the movie... I keep thinking *Harry use your bloody wand*. I haven't read the book, but the movie did turn me off the book. For me the story was great, but the ending was so *Fu#ked up*. It left it wide open. I wont be buying or even watching this movie again if I can help it. Also Daniel Radcliffe looks weird as a father, it looked so out of place. Well that's my thoughts about this movie. Great first movie review Wanda, I will be coming back for more :)Natasha @ Paranormal Goddess Book Blog

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  2. Thanks Natasha. The book does not end this way.... at all. It is way better. I am really glad you liked it. I will see what I can do regarding the movies. Thus far I am not a big movie watcher. But I will maybe try to do some series.

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